Tag: Bars

Best East Village Bars

Best East Village Bars by Ari KellenThe old vanguard of New Yorkers, who remember going to see the Ramones at CBGB’s and the days when Alphabet City was a no-zone, have often complained that the “East Village is dead”.  Maybe the neighborhood doesn’t have the “edge” that it did when it inspired the game-changing rock musical “Rent”, and the cost-of-living has gone up dramatically.  But that’s not to say that a good time can’t still be had in this neighborhood, with 585 active liquor licenses in the neighborhood, you can be sure to find plenty of places to hang out with your friends over a couple beers, a plate of pierogies or an arcade game and have plenty of fun in the process.  Here is a list of some of the top bars in the neighborhood, based off an article that I found online with some of my personal favorite places added in as well:

The 13th Step: If you’re looking for a super rowdy night, then this is the place to go.  It gets crowded here, but if you’re up for downing a few pitchers of Bud Light with your buddies, then you can’t get much better than here.  

Jimmy’s No 43: Located just around the corner from the famed explosion that shook the neighborhood last March, Jimmy’s is considered one of the top beer bars in all of New York, thanks to a pub-like decor, an excellent food menu and an ever-changing selection of delicious (and hard-to-find) craft brews.  If you stop by, be sure to say hello to Jimmy Carbone, the friendly and fun-loving owner who can often be found chatting with patrons.  

Proletariat: Located near Tompkins Square Park, Proletariat, like Jimmy’s, specializes in serving craft beers that you most likely won’t get anywhere else.  The walls are decked with punk art, and the bathroom features pages from a book of Russian prison tattoos.  The only problem is that the bar is a little narrow, so when it gets crowded it gets very crowded.  

Standings: Conveniently located right above Jimmy’s, this sports bar offers a solid selection of beer in a dive-y atmosphere covered with Mets-related gear.  The best bar in the neighborhood to watch a baseball game, there are a surprising number of TV screens to make the experience here truly immersive.  For diehard sports fans, it doesn’t get much better than this.  

Lois: Not too far from (and in the same group as) ABC Beer Co, where many of the bars on this list specialize in beer, here the name of the game is wine.  There are 16 wines on tap in this slick, chic and inviting space, making it a must-visit for any wine nuts.  

Alphabet City Beer Co: The cozy Alphabet City Beer Co offers an array of delicious craft beers, board games and notoriously comfy sofas.  Visit on a lazy weeknight, sit down on a comfy chair, drink a beer, catch up on a book, or maybe bring a friend and you can play a few rounds of “Guess Who”.  They also sell beer here, so be sure to pick up a few cans for your fridge at home while you’re leaving.  

The Wayland: Few New York bars are able to nail the “rustic” look both on the inside and the outside, but few New York bars are like the Wayland.  The cocktails here are something to write home about, using fun ingredients and interesting combinations that are hard to replicate at any other spot in the city.

Lovers of Today: While its underground location make it easy to miss, Lovers of Today is hardly a place that you want to miss.  A snug and dark speakeasy haunt, it features a great menu of specialty cocktails, many of them a couple dollars cheaper than other speakeasies around the city.  The only problem about this place is that on weekend nights it can get a bit loud and crowded.  

NYC and Wine

NYC is, among many things, the cultural hub of the United States. As a hotbed of artistic and creative energy, it’s no wonder that New York’s culinary achievements follow suit. But what enabled The City That Never Sleeps to become the wine capital of the Country? With sommeliers flown in from the world over, The Big Apple is the destination for an enterprising wine enthusiast.

Before the recession hit Las Vegas’ restaurant scene in 2008, it was the top spot for the discerning diner. Rivaling Manhattan for those looking for four-star cuisine, Vegas had been hit hard by the economy, and forced to shift their focus away from fine dining. With no competition to draw sommeliers away, New York reclaimed their position at the top of the list for dining destinations. Now, experts are turning down work overseas in London and Asia, once considered the opportunity of a lifetime, to stay in New York.

The expanded size of NYC restaurants, allowing for 150 seats as opposed to the traditional 50, was initially viewed as a recipe for failure. The increase in size was Ari Kellenprimarily considered a negative because it would detract from the personal, close-quarters dining experience expected of a four-star restaurant. However, the larger floor space allowed for room to be used more efficiently, and the employ of several wine stewards thanks to the ample resources afforded by the increase in guest capacity. The more wine enthusiasts enjoying a night out, the more opportunities for trained professionals to ensure their needs are met.

While wine is considered to be the cornerstone of a good meal, it can often lead to rather high prices when acquiring quality bottles en mass. The NYC sommeliers have taken this into account, and oftentimes vary their selection to run the gamut from top shelf brands to more affordable, but still quality bottles. While a sommeliers services are still valuable to the private collector looking to bolster their own collection, you can still enjoy a quality night out in New York that meets your refined taste.

A Cut Above: The Best Steak in NYC

A well-known and successful steakhouse is about to attempt its east coast debut in the biggest city in the east, New York. Mastro’s, a chain that started in Scottsdale, Arizona has enjoyed success in sunny California and is ready to expand to hungry parts of the country. With their sites set on one of the most competitive markets in the world, Mastro’s will have to compete with a number of other institutions. Steak staples like Morton’s, Del Friscos, Bobby Van’s, and Shula’s make up a fraction of the Michelin-rated competitioAri kellenn waiting for Mastro’s in NYC.

With unique interiors that differ from city to city, you can expect a new experience in each Mastro’s. New York’s decadent restaurant is filled with dark wood furniture and low lighting. Echoing the image of a 50’s New York City steakhouse, the calm and dark demeanor sets this location apart; proving Mastro’s understands how to feed the Big Apple. With a stylistic flair to set itself above the competition, how does Mastro’s meat measure up to the test? Are they serious business, or more sizzle than steak?

Each strip of beautifully cut steak comes from naturally raised, grass fed cows. Though this place is sure to cost a pretty penny, each bite is well worth the hit to your wallet and waistline. Starting at just over $50 and ending around $150, these steaks are for those who know what they want. Additionally, to keep your gorgeous steak company on the plate are sides cooked to perfection. Whether you prefer mashed potatoes with just the right amount of garlic or steamed vegetables, Mastro’s has you covered. For steak connoisseurs looking to taste some of the best in New York City, look no further than the charming Mastro’s for your next meal.

For more information, follow the link! 

The Hidden Bars of NYC

Everyone enjoys a good meal and something to drink. In the capital of what some would consider the greatest food city in the United States, you have more choice in the Big Apple than most. But what if you wanted something a little different from your average restaurant? What if you were looking for a piece of adventure with your meal? Below are some of the best places to get a drink that are hidden from the public eye. So the next time you’re in New York, look up one of these locations and you’ll surely enjoy yourself.

Lantern’s Keep: Dating back to the turn of the century, the Lantern’s Keep is the place to be for those looking to dive into times past. Tucked in the heart of the Iroquois hotel, this quaint cocktail bar is known to only the initiated. A small lantern on the facade of the building is all that marks its, and when the lantern is burning the bar is open. With over 40 unique cocktails designed for the discerning businessmen or businesswoman, anyone looking for a calm night on the town should surely follow the lantern.

No Name Bar: In keeping with its namesake, the No Name Bar is well-hidden behind a wall of burnt-wood. Nothing, not a sign nor a signal, denotes the location of this mysterious bar. If you’re looking for a drink, first you must find the door knocker in the shape of a dragon, and push. Inside you’ll be greeted by a thin, almost traincar like appearance. Small benches and tables line the walls of one of the few bars left in NYC to remain open until 4 am.

Sakagura: In the basement of a seemingly ordinary Midtown office building, Sakagura is waiting for you to come find it. Stepping into this bar willAri Kellen feel like going back into a Japanese village. The main body of the bar is meant to feel like you are sitting outside in an ancient Japanese village. Traditional food and drinks echoing the taste of the Edo period are available for any weary traveler looking to hang up their sword and relax.